Looking behind the curtain – Ronni Salt

1
Twitterati Tirade

If I had a national newspaper column that allowed me to influence millions of readers and I viewed early results of a small survey that seemed . . . different to the political reality, I’d probably use my column to dissect why that is.

I’d look behind the curtain.

 

 

 

 

Because here’s the thing; the 2020 Scanlon Survey on Social Cohesion has not been released in full, so the public can not see for themselves what the columnist is referring to.

We are limited to their single interpretation of it.

 

 


Scanlon Social Cohesion Report 2019

 

 

And one person’s personal interpretation is always a danger.

As are the results of 1 poll.

The Scanlon Report is reasonably respectable but it is only 1 poll.

It’s 1 survey that interviews just over 3,500 people.

It’s a snapshot, not a comprehensive view of all Australians.

 

 

 

So if we take these limited survey results in the Guardian article as gospel, that leaves an interesting challenge – how do we write about them in a manner that shows there’s very real reason for doubt?

As a fantasy columnist I know what I’d do

I’d use the survey to ask – why?

Why is it when the current government has committed more sins, fakeries & corrupt acts than any government Australia has had that we have a public so seemingly oblivious to the fact the Morrison government is governing for themselves and not the survey respondents?

How is that?

 

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Could it be there is a fundamental flaw, a yawning chasm between the reality of the Morrison government and the way in which they market and present themselves?

Is it also because the magician’s assistant in this theatrical Morrison act is the dancing, twirling media themselves?

Add to this heady swirl of Morrison’s glitter and diffusion lights, the magic of social media and the profound influence of the Morrison government’s digital strategists.

Nothing is real. Everything is as they say. Just look at the money they spend to tell you so.

So the idea that in a Covid, post-truth, Trumpian, Cambridge Analytica world that a single survey, or even two, should be looked at in good faith, in a purely myopic way, is a disservice to a public thirsty for authenticity & analysis.

 

People are frightened, confused, scared.

 

 


 

“Trust” in our current fed govt is not what these respondents have.

In a time of crisis, in a world they’ve never seen before, they’re hanging on to whatever tenets of democracy they have.

It’s hope that they have.

Trust is something the Morrison government expended long ago.

 

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by Ronni Salt

 

 

Feature image – Large view

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One thought on “Looking behind the curtain – Ronni Salt

  1. Well done. Excellent piece. We could use more like this. The conservative control on media has reduced most of the content to little more than sloppy public relations and partisan propaganda. Thank you.

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